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Unlock the Benefits of Picture Books: Teaching Acceptance in the Classroom
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Browse this selection of picture books about acceptance to create a more inclusive learning environment and teach your students about respect for others and themselves. They also focus on the importance of being yourself, self-esteem, and empathy for others.

Unlock the Benefits of Picture Books: Teaching Acceptance in the Classroom

Why Read Picture Books about Acceptance?

Teaching a culture of acceptance starts on the first day of the school year. Part of our role as educators is to foster an environment of acceptance

This involves creating a culture of daily acceptance of ourselves and others, building self-esteem, and reducing bullying. No matter the makeup of your classroom, acceptance of appearance, culture and ideas is crucial for a welcoming environment.

By reading picture books about acceptance, students can understand the power of acceptance and how it shapes our relationships with others by taking on board book characters’ experiences and conversations.

For instance, characters from different backgrounds may appear together in the same picture book depicting scenes of friendship or collaboration; this helps drive home the idea that we are all equal regardless of physical or cultural differences.
Teaching acceptance helps shape your students into kinder, more tolerant individuals better equipped to navigate any situation with respect and appreciation.

Unlock the Benefits of Picture Books: Teaching Acceptance in the Classroom

Questions to Use When Reading Children’s Books about Acceptance

  • How did [character] show acceptance for their situation?
  • How did acceptance affect [character]? Why?
  • Why was [character’s] reaction to [someone’s appearance, culture and choice] negative? How could they have reacted with more acceptance?
  • How did [character] go about achieving self-acceptance?
  • How did [character] show acceptance of others?
  • Why did [character] treat someone differently because of their appearance or thoughts? What should they have done?
  • How should we treat people differently from us?
  • Why do you think [character] excluded [character]? What would you have done in the same situation?
  • How can racism, bullying, teasing, picking on others, being mean, etc., affect others?
  • Why is it important for us to show acceptance for others?
  • How can we show acceptance for other people?
  • How can we show self-acceptance?

FREE Activities for Red: A Crayon’s Story

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When teaching acceptance, these books are great choices, they illustrate:

  • It’s okay to be different, and the importance of being yourself and focus on the self-esteem, confidence and courage to do this.
  • Characters modelling empathy, compassion, and acceptance of themselves and others.
  • Characters accepting situations out of their control and learning how to cope during such events.

AAAlligator! by Judith Henderson

boy overcomes his fears to get to know and make friends with a lonely alligator. The townsfolk are not so accepting, and the mayor insists it is driven out of town. Once the community sees the kind and helpful side of the alligator, they help it hide from the mayor.

Use to discuss social justice, empathy, kindness, loneliness, acceptance and inferring.

AAAlligator! by Judith Henderson

I Am Every Good Thing by Derrick Barnes

I Am Every Good Thing celebrates and affirms young black boys. The young, black narrator confidently tells us he is creative, smart, funny, adventurous, and a good friend. We learn how he sometimes fails but always gets back up. He’s afraid when people misunderstand him and call him names.

Promotes discussions on empowerment, self-acceptance, self-confidence, self-esteem, respect, being misunderstood and resilience.

I Am Every Good Thing by Derrick Barnes

Amma’s Sari by Sandhya Parappukkaran

Shreya initially feels awkward about her mother’s sari when they go outside their home. Amma explains to her the importance of the sari, and Shreya learns to appreciate her cultural identity as she navigates the world outside her immigrant family. 

Read to promote discussions on acceptance, cultural identity and asking questions.

Amma's Sari by Sandhya Parappukkaran

The Bad Seed by Jory John

The first of two picture books about acceptance by Jory John. When a “bad seed’ overhears negative comments, he decides to change his ways. He doesn’t change his behaviour overnight but takes it one day at a time.

Promotes a growth mindset, self-management, self-awareness and social awareness.

The Bad Seed Activities and Comprehension Questions

The Barnabus Project by Terry Fan

Strange animals kept in glass bell jars in a mysterious laboratory are failed attempts to make the perfect pets. Destined to be recycled, Barnabus, half mouse, half elephant, takes action to reach his goal of freedom. He does what it takes to reach the outside world through teamwork with his fellow captives.

Use to discuss self-acceptance, cooperation, courage, following your dreams, friendship, and embracing imperfections.

The Barnabus Project by Terry Fan

Beegu by Alexis Deacon

Beegu is lost on Earth. Despite her friendly nature, she finds the Earth unwelcoming, except for a litter of puppies and a group of children.

Reinforces themes of acceptance, belonging, differences, friendship and loneliness.

Beegu by Alexis Deacon book cover

Bob The Artist by Marion Deuchars

Bob is made fun of because of his skinny legs. His lack of self-esteem leaves him deflated until he visits an art gallery and gets inspired!

Promotes a growth mindset, relationship skills, creativity and appreciation.

Bob The Artist by Marion Deuchars

The Boy Who Grew Flowers by Jen Wojtowicz

His teacher and classmates ignoreRrink Bowagon because he sprouts flowers from his body. He notices the new girl wears a flower in her hair and has one leg shorter than the other, so Rink makes her a special pair of shoes. Excited, she invited him to the school dance, where he discovered the flower behind her ear was his.

Read The Boy Who Grew Flowers to teach inferring, self-acceptance, and identity.

The Boy Who Grew Flowers by Jen Wojtowicz

The Boy Who Tried to Shrink His Name by Sandhya Parappukkaran

When Zimdalamishkermishkada starts school, he feels self-conscious about his long name. He decides to go by Zim, but it doesn’t feel right. His mother explains the significance of his name, and he recognises the importance of accepting it. He returns to school and lets everyone know he will be known as Zimdalamashkermishkada, not Zim.

Read to promote discussions on identity, being yourself, individuality, self-acceptance, confidence, and self-esteem.

The Boy Who Tried to Shrink His Name by Sandhya Parappukkaran

The Boy with Flowers in His Hair by Jarvis

David’s best friend tells us how David has flowers in his hair. Like the colourful flowers, he is sweet and gentle, and everyone likes him. One day David comes to school with a hat covering the flowers, which have turned bare and prickly. His best friend wants to help David and gathers his classmates to make flowers for David. His act of compassion and understanding helps David become himself again.

Read The Boy with Flowers in His Hair to promote discussions on friendship, being yourself, kindness, acceptance, coping strategies, compassion, thoughtfulness, and understanding others.

The Boy with Flowers in His Hair by Jarvis

Bug in a Vacuum by Mélanie Watt

A bug is sucked into a vacuum bag as it flies around a house. It goes through the five stages of grief as it tries to come to terms with its situation. Helps children understand the different emotions involved in unexpected and disappointing events.

Read to discuss self-management, overcoming adversity, acceptance, self-reflection and different perspectives.

Bug in a Vacuum by Mélanie Watt

Cappy and the Whale by Kateryna Babkina

Surprised, a young boy finds a whale floating outside his window. Cappy has been hospitalised with leukaemia and is delighted to join the whale for a ride in the sky. 

Read Cappy and the Whale to promote discussions on imagination, perspective, illness, empathy, hope, curiosity and acceptance.

Dog on Stilts by James Thorp

Medium Dog wasn’t interesting; he was average in every way. He devises a way to stand out from the other extraordinary dogs by walking on very tall stilts. When he falls back to earth with a bump, Medium Dog learns a lesson in self-acceptance.

Read this rhyming book to discuss self-acceptance, perspectives, and creative thinking.

Dog on Stilts by James Thorp

Each Kindness by Jacqueline Woodson

Chloe and her friends have been excluding the new girl Maya. When her teacher does a lesson on kindness, Chloe reflects on her behaviour and regrets “each kindness I had never shown.”

Promotes relationship skills, inclusion, kindness and reflection.

Each Kindness Activities and Comprehension Questions

Elmer by David McKee

Elmer, a patchwork of colours, is different from the other elephants. He changes his skin to grey to fit in but discovers he enjoys being different. The other elephants accept Elmer for who he is, and he realises it is okay to be different.

Elmer promotes discussions on individuality, acceptance, self-awareness, open-mindedness, and the importance of being oneself.

Elmer by David McKee

Giraffes Can’t Dance by Giles Andreae

Giraffes Can’t Dance? Or can they? Gerald is determined to take part in the annual Jungle dance. While the other animals laugh, he shows perseverance, determination, and confidence to follow his dream.

Giraffes Can't Dance by Giles Andreae

Goliath: The Boy Who Was Different by Ximo Abadía

A boy always felt different. He was big, strong and brave but never felt a sense of belonging. Goliath set out to find a place where he felt more comfortable, only to realise he was just fine, just where he always was. 

Read Goliath to promote discussions on first-person narration, perspective, self-acceptance and belonging.

Goliath: The Boy Who Was Different by Ximo Abadía

The Good Egg by John Jory

The second of two picture books about acceptance by Jory John. A virtuous egg spends its time helping people out, whether it’s needed or wanted! One day The Good Egg cracks (literally) from the pressure of perfection. It takes a much-needed break where it learns to live a more balanced life.

Promotes acceptance, balance, well-being and self-management.

The Good Egg by Jory John

Guji Guji by Chih-Yuan Chen

Guji Guji was raised as a duck but discovers he is actually a crocodile. The other crocodiles want Guji Guji to help them eat his duck family, but he instead formulates a plan to save them.

Promotes acceptance, identity, problem-solving and a sense of belonging.

Guji Guji by Chih-Yuan Chen

A Home Again by Colleen Rowan Kosinski

A house tells how it loves the family that lives within its walls. But one day, the family left, and the house didn’t think it could be happy again. When strangers come to look around the house, it makes noises trying to scare them off. But when a couple moves in, the house becomes a home once again.

Read A Home Again in His Hair to promote discussions on overcoming loss, acceptance, perspective, and LGBTQ+ characters.

A Home Again by Colleen Rowan Kosinski

Leila in Saffron by Rukhsanna Guidroz

Leila learns self-acceptance from her grandmother and an understanding of her heritage. Her grandmother complements the saffron beads on her scarf, leading Leila to seek characteristics that make up her unique identity as a Pakistani American.

Leila in Saffron by Rukhsanna Guidroz

Lila and the Crow by Gabrielle Grimard

Lila’s dark skin, hair and eyes make her stand out at her new school. She is bullied and likened to a crow. She embraces who she is at the autumn festival costume party and comes dressed as a crow. 

Promotes self-acceptance, self-awareness, discrimination, resilience, and loneliness.

Lila and the Crow by Gabrielle Grimard

The Little Ghost Who Was a Quilt by Riel Nason

A little ghost is a quilt. It can’t whirl and whirl in the sky because it gets very hot each time it flies. It feels very left out when it can’t keep up with its friends. One Halloween, the lonely little quilt finds its place in the world and makes new friends.

Read The Little Ghost Who Was a Quilt to start discussions on individuality, belonging, self-acceptance and overcoming challenges.

The Little Ghost Who Was a Quilt by Riel Nason

The Many Colors of Harpreet Singh by Supriya Kelkar

Harpreet Singh expresses himself with colours, particularly through his patka, Sikh headwear. When he moves from California to a town with snow, Harpreet has trouble settling in. He only wears white so he can feel invisible. When he finds his first new friend, the colour returns.

Use to promote acceptance, kindness, courage and coping in new situations.

The Many Colors of Harpreet Singh by Supriya Kelkar

My Name is Bilal by Asma Mobin-Uddin

When Bilal moves he worries about being teased for being Muslim. He thinks about telling his new classmates he is called Bill and not telling them about his religion. A Muslim teacher helps Bilal and his sister settle in by giving them a book about Bilal Ibn Rabah, another Bilal who struggled with his identity.

My Name is Bilal by Asma Mobin-Uddin

Naked Mole Rat Gets Dressed by Mo Willems

Wilbur, a naked mole rat, loves to wear clothes, but he worries the rest of the colony won’t accept him. The leader, Grand-pah, proclaims they should show him tolerance, and the naked mole rats experiment with clothing.

Promotes acceptance, individuality, open-mindedness, and self-awareness.

Naked Mole Rat Gets Dressed by Mo Willems

The Name Jar by Yangsook Choi

When Unhei moves from Korea to America, her classmates can’t pronounce her name. She wants to choose a new name that is easier to pronounce but decides she likes her name just the way it is.

Promotes themes of acceptance, identity, integrity, open-mindedness, principled and tolerance.

The Name Jar Activities and Comprehension Questions

The New Girl by Nicola Davies

The first of three picture books about acceptance by Nicola Davies. After moving, a girl finds her new classmates hostile. She was different from them, spoke a different language and ate food that smelled different. Feeling lonely, she makes origami flowers, impressing her classmates. She teaches them to create the flowers, and they begin to see the new girl in a new, positive light.

Read The New Girl to discuss acceptance, bullying, making friends, moving home, starting school, point of view, empathy, and inclusion.

The New Girl Nicola Davies

Perfect by Nicola Davies

The second of three picture books about acceptance by Nicola Davies. A young boy learns to accept and embrace his baby sister’s disability when caring for an injured bird. A story of love, acceptance and disappointment.

Perfect by Nicola Davies

Perfectly Norman by Tom Percival

Norman was a perfectly normal boy until he grew a pair of wings. He loves flying but thinks no one will understand his new wings, so hides them under a large, yellow coat. He gets a surprising reaction when he finds the courage to show off his wings.

Perfectly Norman promotes identity, self-awareness, self-esteem and acceptance.

Perfectly Norman by Tom Percival

The Pond by Nicola Davies

The third of three picture books about acceptance by Nicola Davies. A young boy describes the loss of his father and how family members experience grief differently. They try to cope by rebuilding the pond he created when he was alive.

Reinforces themes of acceptance, bereavement, relationship skills and self-management.

The Pond by Nicola Davies

Red: A Crayon’s Story by Michael Hall

Red’s label says red, but he can only create blue no matter how hard he tries. Red’s new friend, Berry, suggests he casts aside his label, opening a whole new world to Red.

Promotes discussions on adaptability, identity, self-awareness and acceptance.

Red: A Crayon’s Story by Michael Hall

Shelter by Céline Claire

All the animals are safe in their home as a storm approaches. When two strangers appear asking for shelter, the animals are suspicious and turn them away. As the storm worsens, a family of foxes find themselves in need of shelter. The two strangers show the kindness the other animals wouldn’t give.

Translated from French, Shelter promotes discussions on helping those in need, empathy, compassion, acceptance and immigration.

Shelter by Céline Claire

The Story of You by Lisa Ann Scott

You are the authors of your own stories. No one can tell you who you are ―it’s up to you! The Story of You illustrates how the actions we take and the words we say are essential to who we are.

Promotes discussions on identity, acceptance, confidence, empowerment, kindness, perseverance, individuality, and positivity.

The Story of You by Lisa Ann Scott

Sugar in Milk by Thrity Umrigar

A young girl moves to a new country. Everything is unfamiliar, and she longs for the feeling of her home. Her aunt tells her story of Persian refugees who convince a reluctant Indian king they will sweeten the life of their adopted home. After hearing the story, the girl starts integrating, never forgetting who she is. 

Read Sugar in Milk to promote discussions on immigration, acceptance, loneliness, homesickness and folktales.

Sugar in Milk by Thrity Umrigar

Sulwe by Lupita Nyong’o

Sulwe’s skin is darker than everyone in her family and at school. She wants to lighten her skin, the colour of midnight, so she is no longer teased. Her mama empowers Sulwe by telling her a story that helps her love and accepts who she is and dismisses the negative opinions of others.

Sulwe by Lupita Nyong'o

The Ugly Duckling by Jerry Pinkney

An ugly duckling faces many difficult situations. and longs to fly away with other birds. It grows into a beautiful swan, discovering happiness and its true identity. Promotes resilience, identity, self-awareness, and acceptance.

The Ugly Duckling by Jerry Pinkney

Trying by Kobi Yamada

A boy begins to understand he can learn from his mistakes and that everyone doubts their abilities when trying something new.

Read Trying to promote discussions on self-acceptance, self-esteem, perseverance, curiosity, determination, growth mindset, and failure is just the beginning of the journey.

Trying by Kobi Yamada

The Wall by Jessie James

Tom loves to explore until he hears adults talking about the monsters living in the world. He becomes too scared to explore anymore, and the adults build a wall to keep out the monsters. Life soon becomes dreary. When a colourful message comes over the wall, Tom starts exploring again and persuades the adults there is nothing to be afraid of.

Use to discuss fears, risk-taking, curiosity, inclusion, and asking questions.

The Wall by Jessie James

We’re All Wonders by R J Palacio

Auggie shares how he likes to do ordinary things but just doesn’t look ordinary. He wants to believe someone will accept him for who he is.

Promotes self-esteem, identity, friendship and open-mindedness.

We’re All Wonders by R J Palacio

When I Draw a Panda by Amy June Bates

A girl draws a panda who helps her embrace her unique outlook. Her shapes aren’t perfect, but she is not discouraged. She draws the world in her own way.

Read When I Draw a Panda to promote discussions on challenging conformity, originality, growth mindset, transformation, creativity, reflection, perfectionism, accepting mistakes, and self-acceptance.

When I Draw a Panda by Amy June Bates

You Matter by Christian Robinson

Watch unique and diverse characters working and playing together but who experience the world from their own and different perspectives.

You Matter by Christian Robinson

In Conclusion

Classroom discussions of the books give students a platform to voice their stories and gain the courage to present their true selves. Teaching acceptance and establishing a culture of acceptance and understanding in the classroom can give our students a better foundation for life’s future challenges. 

Reading picture books about acceptance can help build empathy and understanding, embrace diversity, and help build self-esteem and resilience.

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Unlock the Benefits of Picture Books: Teaching Acceptance in the Classroom

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