Children’s Books to Read During Ramadan & Eid

Children's Books to Read During Ramadan & Eid

Ramadan is the most important religious observance for Muslims around the world. Read on for some wonderful picture books about Ramadan & Eid.

Children's Books to Read During Ramadan & Eid-al-Fitr

What is Ramadan?

Muslims observe Ramadan during the ninth month of the Islamic calendar. It is the most important Islamic religious observance for millions of Muslims around the world. The start of Ramadan varies every year, depends on the new moon of the ninth month.

During the month of Ramadan, Muslims fast, meaning they refrain from consuming any food or drink between sunrise and sunset. This encourages Muslims to pray and to live a virtuous life. Many people will give to charity during Ramadan, donating food and clothes to the poor.

Muslims break their fast at sunset every evening by eating dates and drinking water. They pray and then eat a meal with family and friends.

Before sunrise, people eat breakfast and pray before the fast begins again. Not everyone has to fast, including the sick, elderly, pregnant women and young children.

What is Eid-al-Fitr?

The 3-day celebration of Eid-al-Fitr starts at the end of Ramadan. While it is a time of enjoyment, it is also a time for forgiveness. Muslins thank Allah for giving them the strength to complete the fast. As with Ramadan, Eid-al-Fitr begins with the sighting of the new moon.

The celebration involves praying at the mosque, wearing their best clothes and giving gifts to family and friends. People will decorate their homes and have a large meal to celebrate the end of Ramadan.

The BBC gives a great overview of Ramadan and Eid-al-Fitr for children, including videos.

Scroll down for a varied selection of books celebrating Ramadan and Eid-al-Fitr. They are perfect to use in the classroom and at home.

Picture Books to Read During Ramadan & Eid

As well as books about Ramadan you will find books about Muslim families that are a great introduction to Islamic traditions.

The Best Eid Ever by Asma Mobin-Uddin

Aneesa’s Nonni gives her three outfits, one for each day of Eid. At her local Mosque, she meets two refugee sisters wearing ill-fitting clothes. She wonders what Eid must be like for them after leaving their homes to move to America. Aneesa comes up with a plan to help the sisters have the best Eid ever.

Crescent Moons and Pointed Minarets by Helen Khan

Celebrate the traditions and shapes of the Islamic world. Explore the crescent moon, a square garden and an octagonal fountain, among others.

Deep In The Sahara by Kelly Cunnane

In Mauritania, young Lalla wishes to wear a malafa like her mother and older sister. In the Muslim tradition, women wear colourful material over their head and clothes. When Lalla learns a malafa is not only beautiful but honours her faith, as her mother wraps one around her body.

Drummer Girl by Hiba Masood

Najma dreams of being a musaharati, the drummer who wakes families in her Turkish village for the pre-dawn meal during Ramadan. No girl has ever taken on this role and Najma has to show determination and self-belief to follow her dreams.

Promotes courage, overcoming fears, and risk-taking.

The Gift of Ramadan by Rabiah York Lumbard

Sophie is disappointed with herself when she breaks her first Ramadan fast. Her grandmother and mother explain the meaning of Ramadan and that there different expectation for different age groups. She learns she can earn blessings in various ways.

Golden Domes and Silver Lanterns: A Muslim Book of Colors by Hena Khan

A young girl uses colours to describe the important traditions of her Muslim faith. Hena Khan uses Arabic vocabulary throughout the rhyming text to describe the customs and beauty of Islam.

Lailah's Lunchbox: A Ramadan Story by Reem Faruqi

Lailah and her family have emigrated to a new country and she has to start at a new school. She is excited to finally participate in the upcoming Ramadan fast but worries about the reaction of her new classmates.

Leila in Saffron by Rukhsanna Guidroz

Leila learns self-acceptance from her grandmother and an understanding of her heritage. Her grandmother complements the saffron beads on her scarf, leading Leila to seek out characteristics that make up her unique identity as a Pakistani American.

My First Ramadan by Karen Katz

A small boy describes the traditions his family observe during the holy month of Ramadan. He eats breakfast before sunrise and fasts throughout his school day. At sunset, the family wash their hands and eat a date before their evening meal. They finish the day by visiting the local mosque.

My Name is Bilal by Asma Mobin-Uddin

When Bilal moves he worries about being teased for being Muslim. He thinks about telling his new classmates he is called Bill and not telling them about his religion. A Muslim teacher helps Bilal and his sister settle in by giving them a book about Bilal Ibn Rabah, another Bilal who struggled with his identity.

The Proudest Blue: A Story of Hijab and Family by Ibtihaj Muhammad

On the first day of school sisters, Asiya and Faizah walk in hand in hand. Asiya is wearing a hijab for the first time, which represents being strong. Faizah admires her sister’s beautiful blue scarf but hears other children making fun of her. The sisters follow their mother’s advice about being strong and true to themselves in the face of bullying.

Promotes themes of tolerance, self-esteem, making connections, and different points of view.

Ramadan by Hannah Eliot

When the crescent moon rises during the ninth month it is time for Ramadan. Learn about the traditions of Ramadan and how Muslims reflect, are thankful and help others less fortunate during this time.

Ramadan Moon by Na'ima B. Robert

Celebrate Ramadan and Eid-ul-Fitr through the eyes of a Muslim child. Witness the fasting, the changing of the moon and the joyful celebrations of Eid.

Rashad's Ramadan and Eid al-Fitr by Lisa Bullard

Find out about Ramadan, one of the most special times of the year in the Islamic calendar. Rashad shows how he pays, fasts and thinks of other people. At the end of the month, Rashad enjoys the fears of Eid al-Fitr.

Razia's Ray of Hope: One Girl's Dream of an Education by Elizabeth Suneby

A new school opens in a small Afghan village. Razia has to convince her father and brothers that she should attend and follow her dreams of receiving an education. This book is based on true stories from the Zabuli Education Center for Girls.

Sitti's Secrets by Naomi Shihab Nye

A young girl visits Palestine to see her grandmother, Sitti, for the first time. She learns about Sitti’s culture and traditions. The visit is shown through the girl’s point of view and shows how they communicate without speaking each other’s language.

Under My Hijab by Hena Khan

Four children share their lives under the umbrella of love. It is a reminder that no matter the distance, our loved ones will always be there for us. The umbrella is a metaphor for love, acceptance, comfort, and safety.

Under the Ramadan Moon by Sylvia Whitman

A family wait for the Ramadan moon, one of the most special times in the Islamic year. The family pray, fast, read the Quran and give to the poor under this special moon.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. If you purchase anything through them, I will get a small referral fee and you will be supporting me and my blog at no extra cost to you, so thank you! You can find more information here.

What Next?

What are your favourite picture books to read during Ramadan and Eid? Let me know in the comments.

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Children's Books to Read During Ramadan & Eid-al-Fitr

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18 Children's Books to Read During Ramadan & Eid-al-Fitr

Ramadan is the most important religious observance for Muslims around the world. Read on for some wonderful picture books about Ramadan & Eid-al-Fitr.

18 Children's Books to Read During Ramadan & Eid-al-Fitr

What is Ramadan?

Muslims observe Ramadan during the ninth month of the Islamic calendar. It is the most important Islamic religious observance for millions of Muslims around the world. The start of Ramadan varies every year, depends on the new moon of the ninth month.

During the month of Ramadan, Muslims fast, meaning they refrain from consuming any food or drink between sunrise and sunset. This encourages Muslims to pray and to live a virtuous life. Many people will give to charity during Ramadan, donating food and clothes to the poor.

Muslims break their fast at sunset every evening by eating dates and drinking water. They pray and then eat a meal with family and friends.

Before sunrise, people eat breakfast and pray before the fast begins again. Not everyone has to fast, including the sick, elderly, pregnant women and young children.

What is Ed-al-Fitr?

The 3-day celebration of Eid-al-Fitr starts at the end of Ramadan. While it is a time of enjoyment, it is also a time for forgiveness. Muslins thank Allah for giving them the strength to complete the fast. As with Ramadan, Eid-al-Fitr begins with the sighting of the new moon.

The celebration involves praying at the mosque, wearing their best clothes and giving gifts to family and friends. People will decorate their homes and have a large meal to celebrate the end of Ramadan.

The BBC gives a great overview of Ramadan and Eid-al-Fitr for children, including videos.

Picture Books about Ramadan

Scroll down for a varied selection of books celebrating Ramadan and Eid-al-Fitr. As well as books about Ramadan you will find books about Muslim families that are a great introduction to Islamic traditions. 

Related Posts

Further Reading

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. If you purchase anything through them, I will get a small referral fee and you will be supporting me and my blog at no extra cost to you, so thank you! You can find more information here.

Did you enjoy this post? Why not share it!

18 Children's Books to Read During Ramadan & Eid-al-Fitr

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