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The Snowy Day Activities for the Classroom
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Winter Reading: The Snowy Day Activities for the Classroom

This blog post delves into The Snowy Day activities tailored for the classroom. From making predictions and sequencing events to inferring emotions and understanding themes, each activity is designed to enrich students' comprehension and appreciation of the story. Dive into our extensive guide, featuring questions and activities perfect for bringing ‘The Snowy Day' to life in your classroom.

The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats

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The Snowy Day Summary

In The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats, Peter wakes up to find the world outside covered in fresh, fluffy snow. With his bright red snowsuit on, Peter embarks on a day full of winter wonder and adventures.

He kicks up snow piles, makes tracks with his feet and a stick, builds a snowman, and even engages in a one-sided snowball fight with a tree. He also experiences the quiet beauty of a snow-covered park and the thrill of sliding down a snowy mountain.

Peter saves a snowball in his pocket for later. But he's a little crestfallen when he finds it's melted at the end of the day. Yet, the snowy day continues, promising more fun adventures tomorrow.

The Snowy Day Snowy Day Activities

The Snowy Day celebrates childhood joy, exploration, simple pleasures, and the beauty of nature. This post will focus on The Snowy Day activities for prediction, sequencing, inference, and main idea & theme.

The Snowy Day Read-Aloud Questions

  • How does Peter feel when he sees the snow? How do you know?
  • What are some things Peter does in the snow?
  • Why does Peter put a snowball in his pocket?
  • What happens to the snowball, and how does Peter react?
  • Can you predict what Peter will do the next time it snows?
  • What is the sequence of events in the story?
  • How does the story's setting affect what happens in the story?
  • What do Peter's actions tell us about his character?
  • How would the story be different if it was not a snowy day?
  • Why do you think the author wrote about a snowy day?
  • What connections can you make between this story and your own experiences?
  • How does the author use cause and effect in the story?
  • How does the story's ending relate to its beginning?


I have over 90 questions to use before, during, and after reading The Snowy Day in this activity pack

The Snowy Day Read-Aloud Questions
Click on the images for The Snowy Day read-aloud questions

Making Predictions Activities

The narrative's straightforward progression makes it ideal for teaching prediction skills. As Peter sets out on his snowy adventure, students can make predictions about what he will do next.

Sequential Plot: The book's plot follows a clear, sequential pattern, which can help students predict what might happen next.

  • Activity – Story Mapping: Have students create a story map, noting what happens at each stage of the story. Then, before revealing the next part of the story, ask students to predict what might happen next based on their story map.

Visual Cues: The book's vivid illustrations provide visual cues to help students make educated guesses about the plot.

  • Activity – Picture Predictions: Before reading the text on each page, ask students to predict what might happen next based on the illustrations.

Repetitive Actions: The character's actions in the book, such as exploring the snow and trying different activities, are repetitive, providing a pattern that can help students predict future events.

  • Activity – Pattern Tracking: Have students track the patterns in the character's actions and use them to predict what he might do next.

Cause and Effect Relationships: The book depicts clear cause-and-effect relationships, such as the snowball disappearing when brought indoors, which can be used to predict outcomes.

  • Activity – Cause-and-Effect Predictions: After identifying a cause-and-effect relationship, pause and ask students to predict the outcome before revealing it.
The Snowy Day Inference Activities
Click on the images to explore inference activities for The Snowy Day.

Sequencing Activities

The story presents a clear sequence of events that can help students practice arranging events in the order they occurred. For instance, students can create a timeline of Peter's day, from waking up to discovering the snow to his various activities throughout the day and, finally, his return home. 

Chronological Structure: The book follows the main character's activities over a day chronologically, which is perfect for teaching sequence.

  • Activity – Story Timeline: Have students create a timeline of the events in the story. This helps to see the clear sequence of events and understand how time progression affects the storyline.

Visual Cues: The book's illustrations provide visual cues that can aid in understanding the sequence of events.

  • Activity – Picture Sequencing: Students can look at the pictures and describe the sequence of events.

Clear Cause-and-Effect Relationships: The story contains clear cause-and-effect relationships, such as the snowball melting when brought indoors, which can help students understand the sequence.

  • Activity – Cause-and-Effect Chains: Have students create cause-and-effect chains where they must put events in the correct order based on cause and effect.

Repetitive Actions: The main character's actions, like exploring the snow, are repetitive yet build upon each other, providing a pattern to help students understand the sequence.

  • Activity – Sequence Predictions: After identifying a pattern in the character's actions, ask students to predict what might come next.
The Snowy Day FREE Activities
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Inference Activities

The text does not explicitly describe Peter's feelings, but students can infer them from his actions and expressions. This helps students practice the skill of concluding based on textual evidence. 

Show-not-tell Writing Style: Keats uses a show-not-tell writing style, allowing students to infer details about the character and plot.

  • Activity – Inference Charts: Have students create charts listing inferred details and the text evidence that supports their inferences.

Visual Cues: The book's illustrations provide visual cues to help students infer story details.

  • Activity – Picture Inferences: Before reading the text on each page, ask students to make inferences based on the illustrations.

Emotional Content: The main character experiences various emotions throughout the story, providing opportunities for students to make inferences about his feelings.

  • Activity – Emotion Inference Journal: Students can write journal entries from the main character's perspective, inferring his feelings based on the story events.

Subtle Cause-and-Effect Relationships: The story contains cause-and-effect relationships, such as the snowball melting when brought indoors, which can help students make inferences about outcomes.

  • Activity – Cause-and-Effect Inferences: After identifying a cause-and-effect relationship, pause and ask students to infer the outcome before revealing it. 
The Snowy Day Prediction Activities
Click on the images to explore prediction activities for The Snowy Day.

The Snowy Day Book Video

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