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Cover of a book titled "All Are Welcome" with an illustration of diverse children holding hands. Text to the right reads "All Are Welcome Literacy Activities" on a yellow background.
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All Are Welcome Activities: Boost Inclusivity and Literacy Skills

All Are Welcome by Alexandra Penfold is an excellent choice for back-to-school time because it addresses important themes like inclusivity, empathy, and community building. All Are Welcome celebrates students’ unique backgrounds and differences in an environment where they feel safe to be themselves. This article focuses on making connections, point of view, and sequencing.

Colorful educational materials include a multicultural children's book titled "All Are Welcome," worksheets for inference and making connections, colored pencils, All Are Welcome activities, and a banner with the alphabet.

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All Are Welcome Summary

All Are Welcome celebrates students’ unique backgrounds and differences in an environment where they feel safe to be themselves. Students feel welcome, included, and appreciated in their classroom, despite their background, race, and culture. 

The reader follows a group of children through a day going to school. They come from different cultural backgrounds and have different morning and evening routines. Children and their families express themselves freely through their actions, food, clothes, and routines.

All Are Welcome Discussion Points

  • Inclusivity: The book showcases a classroom where every child, regardless of background, is included.
  • Diversity: Cultural diversity highlights its richness in our lives and learning environments.
  • Community: The strength and support of a close-knit community emphasize the importance of collaboration and mutual respect.
  • Consequences of Actions: Our actions and attitudes towards others can have positive or negative consequences.
  • Respect: Respect for differences is a core theme, teaching students to appreciate the unique qualities of their peers.

All Are Welcome Activities

All Are Welcome by Alexandra Penfold is an excellent choice for back to school time because it addresses important themes like inclusivity, diversity, and the importance of community. This post focuses on activities for:

Making Personal Connections with All Are Welcome

All Are Welcome presents a relatable school setting, diverse cultural representations, universal themes, and everyday activities, allowing students to connect the text to their own lives, other texts, and the world around them.

Activity: Have students use a T-chart with one column labeled “Book” and the other “My Life.” Students will write or draw events from the book in the “Book” column and then describe similar events from their own school experiences in the “My Life” column.

Identify key activities and moments in the book, such as arriving at school, classroom activities, playtime, lunch, and end-of-day routines, and add them to the “Book” column.

Image of educational materials showing a worksheet titled "Making Connections" with sections for "The Book" and "My Life," and a book cover titled "All Are Welcome Activities," featuring diverse children.
Click the image or the box below to get FREE All Are Welcome making connection activity in your inbox.

In the “My Life” column, have students write or draw similar events from their own school experiences. Encourage them to think about:

  • How do they arrive at school?
  • What classroom activities do they participate in?
  • What do they do during playtime and lunch?
  • How does their school day end?

Once the T-charts are complete, discuss the similarities and differences they found between the book and their own experiences.

Exploring Inference with All Are Welcome

The story allows students to infer what different characters are thinking because of the minimal text.

Activity: Create a map with sections representing the children and their activities in the book. Identify what each character might think and feel during different events. 

Divide the map into sections representing key events (e.g., arriving at school, participating in class, playing at recess, eating lunch, etc.).

Give the students an individual worksheet for them to infer what different characters might think and feel during the same event. Encourage them to consider questions like:

A children's inference anchor chart is displayed on a chalkboard. It features a drawing of a girl divided into six sections: morning, school, lunchtime, playtime, afternoon, and evening & bedtime.
Click on the images to explore more inference activities for All Are Welcome.

Give the students an individual worksheet for them to infer what different characters might think and feel during the same event. Encourage them to consider questions like:

  • What is my character doing in this scene?
  • How might they be feeling? Why?
  • What are they thinking about the other characters or the situation?

After filling in the worksheet, discuss the findings:

  • How do different characters feel during the same event?
  • What might cause these different feelings and thoughts?
  • How can understanding these perspectives help us be more inclusive and empathetic in our own lives?
A collection of colorful pens, a worksheet, and a children's book titled "All Are Welcome." The worksheet, part of the "All Are Welcome Activities," prompts students to infer characters' thoughts and feelings. An alphabet banner is also visible.
Click on the images to explore more inference activities for All Are Welcome.

Teaching Sequencing Skills with All Are Welcome

The book’s clear and linear narrative suits it for teaching sequencing skills. It follows the children’s day from morning to evening, providing distinct events that can be easily ordered.

Activity: Students will sequence the events of a typical day as shown in the book. Provide students with pictures or sentences describing different parts of the day and arrange these in the order they occur, from morning activities to bedtime.

  • Morning Activities: What is the first thing the children do in the morning?
  • School Activities: What activities do the children participate in while at school?
  • Playtime: What do the children do during playtime?
  • Afternoon: What activities do the children do in the afternoon?
  • Evening and Bedtime: How do the children wind down their day in the book?
A set of storytelling sequence cards lies on a table with a pair of scissors, colored pencils in a tray, and an All Are Welcome Activities logo in the corner.
Click on the images to explore more sequencing activities for All Are Welcome.

FREE Activity for All Are Welcome

Discussion Questions for All Are Welcome

All Are Welcome questions are designed to enhance students’ reading comprehension and encourage them to consider a positive and inclusive classroom.

  1. How would you describe the students and teachers in All Are Welcome? 
  2. What character traits did you see in All Are Welcome?
  3. How does Alexandra Penfold make it clear the characters feel welcome?
  4. How can we welcome visitors and new students into our classroom/community?
  5. Have you ever felt unwelcome? How did you feel? Did that experience change how you make other people feel welcome?
  6. What do you do when someone brings in food that is unfamiliar to you?
  7. What connections can you make to how the characters say hello and goodbye and their different routines, faiths, and food?
  8. Describe how our differences make our classroom community interesting and strong.
  9. Describe the actions involved in including or excluding someone. What are the differences?
  10. What did you learn that you can use to help others feel welcome?

This activity pack includes over 90 questions for All Are Welcome to use before, during, and after reading the book.

Have you used All Are Welcome in your classroom? Let me know how you used it!

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